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Know Myth


Posted By:  Liz Goodrich
Date Posted:  1/27/2015



Know Myth All cultures make meaning out of the world around them by weaving together stories, experiences, and metaphors in complex ways. In a world that is inherently mysterious and infinite, myths are one way human cultures make sense out of the unknown and unknowable, of delight and of fear.

This February Deschutes Public Library invites you explore the role, the function and the origins of myth.



The presentations, by local experts, authors and educators, are free and open to the public.



Programs


Know Myth: The Development of Classical Mythology
Greek and later Roman mythologies are, in general terms, “sky-god” (as opposed to “earth-mother”) systems. However, both cultures adopted and adapted local deities into their systems as their territories increased. COCC professor Eleanor Latham explores how classical mythology developed.


Know Myth: Gods and Goddesses
Cultures around the world and throughout time share myths in common. From Greece to Africa, myths have been told to help people ask and answer the fundamental questions of who am I, where did I come from, why am I here, how should I live, and what is the right thing to do. Community librarians Nate Pedersen and Chandra vanEijinsbergen introduce you to some of their favorite books inspired by mythologies from around the world.
Thursday, February 5 • 2:30 p.m.
Aspen Ridge, 1010 NE Purcell Blvd., Bend, OR 97701


Know Myth: Jarold Ramsey and Native American Legends
Academic, folklorist and poet Jarold Ramsey explores the legends of the Indians of Central Oregon. Ramsey has written two non-fiction books that explore Native American literature: Reading the Fire: The Traditional Indian Literatures of America and Coyote Was Going There: Traditional Literature of the Oregon Country.
Saturday, February 7 • 3:00 p.m.
Downtown Bend Library



The Anthropology of Myth: Tall Tales, Fish Stories & the Magic of Words
Cultural anthropologists Amy Harper and Elizabeth Marino discuss how anthropologists conceive of myth across the highly varied stories that are created by different cultures. We will explore whether myths can be considered "true" or "untrue"; and talk about a handful of specific myths that are told and retold in particular circumstances to pass on knowledge, to explain the world around us, and to highlight cultural values.


Know Myth: Jung, Freud and the Origin of Myth
COCC Professor Terry Kreuger explores the archetypes of myth and what the mean to us.


For more information about this or other library programs, please visit the library website at www.deschuteslibrary.org. People with disabilities needing accommodations (alternative formats, seating or auxiliary aides) should contact Liz at 312-1032.

Page Last Modified Thursday, July 30, 2020


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