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Seeding A Sense of Place: Science, Stories, and Smart Forest Policy


Posted By:  Liz Goodrich
Date Posted:  2/27/2011

Gail WellsHow does our allegiance to places affect our opinions about land use, particularly forest use? How do we build meanings into places individually and collectively through storytelling and public policy? This is the focus of “Seeding a Sense of Place: Science, Stories, and Smart Forest Policy,” a free conversation with independent writer and editor Gail Wells on Tuesday, March 8, 2011 at 6:30 at Redmond Public Library. This program is hosted by Deschutes Public Library, City Club of Central Oregon and sponsored by Oregon Humanities (formerly Oregon Council for the Humanities). Lodging for scholars has been generously donated by The Oxford Hotel.

Wells is an award-winning independent writer and editor specializing in history and natural-resource science. Her most recent book is The Little Lucky: A Family Geography (OSU Press, 2008). She is also the author of The Tillamook: A Created Forest Comes of Age (OSU Press, 1999) and coauthor of Lewis and Clark Meet Oregon’s Forests: Lessons from Dynamic Nature (Oregon Forest Resources Institute, 2001).

For more information about this free community discussion, please contact Liz at 541/312-1032 or lizg@deschuteslibrary.org. People with disabilities needing accommodations (alternative formats, seating or auxiliary aides) should contact Liz at 312-1032 prior to the presentation.



Through the Conversation Project: A New Chautauqua, Oregon Humanities offers free programs that engage community members in thoughtful, challenging conversations about ideas critical to our daily lives and our state's future. Oregon Humanities (813 SW Alder St, #702, Portland, OR 97205) believes in the power of ideas to change lives and transform communities. More information about Oregon Humanities’ programs and publications, which include the Conversation Project: A New Chautauqua, Think & Drink, Humanity in Perspective, Teacher Institutes, Happy Camp, Public Program Grants, Responsive Program Grants, and Oregon Humanities magazine, can be found at oregonhumanities.org. Oregon Humanities is an independent, nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities and a partner of the Oregon Cultural Trust.

Page Last Modified Wednesday, June 23, 2021


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