Raise a Reader - Early Literacy

Why is early literacy important?

A child who enters kindergarten with a strong vocabulary, a love of books, and a familiarity with playing with words, has a definite advantage. You can help those skills develop.

Experts agree that talking, singing, reading, writing and playing with your young child will prepare them for learning how to read, and will teach them the six skills needed to read.


  • Talk

    The more you talk and read to your child, the more vocabulary they will learn, which is one of the six skills needed to learn to read.

    What can you do?

    • Talk, talk, talk with your young child, right from birth.
    • Don’t be afraid to use unfamiliar words, but do be willing to explain what mean.
    • Make sure that you encourage your child to talk, and remember to listen.
    • When your child makes a mistake (“I goed to the park.”), correct the mistake with the appropriate words, such as, “Yes, you went to the park. And what did you do?”
    • Choose books with unusual words because children hear three times more “rare” words in books than they will hear in conversation.
  • Read with your child

    Research has proven over and over that the single most important activity a parent can do with a child is read aloud.

    Snuggling with your child while reading a story helps brain development and bonding, and results in print motivation, the enjoyment of books. Reading aloud also helps your child with print awareness, the early literacy skill that means understanding how a book works, and that print is what we read.

    What can you do?

    • Read about things that fascinate your child, such as trucks or fairies or worms. This helps them increase their knowledge, as well as teach them that answers can be found in books.
    • Attend story time at the library, where you’ll be introduced to the best books.
    • Give books as gifts on special days.
    • Read aloud for a total of at least 20 minutes every day, right from birth.
    • Be sure your child sees you read what you like, too.
    • Make sure books are in easy reach for your child.
    • Use books to teach the alphabet, which is letter knowledge, another early literacy skill. Choose a letter of the day, such as B, and read about bears and bees. Read about bubbles while your child is in the bath, and a bedtime story at the end of the day.
  • Rhyme and sing with your child

    Rhyming helps children learn how to take words apart, and change their beginnings or endings to make new words. That’s part of phonological awareness, another skill needed to learn to read.

    Check out our favorite songs, rhymes, tickles and lap bounces.

    What can you do?

    • When you’re on a walk, choose a word and think of all the words you can that rhyme with it. They don’t have to make sense!
    • Give everyone, including pets, a rhyming name for a day. Daddy Laddy, Bethany Pethany, Spot Dot.
    • Learn to sing “The Name Game.”
    • Read aloud books that have rhyming stories; just ask library staff for recommendations.

    Singing takes apart words into their smaller parts, which also helps children to understand later about the phonics of reading.

    What can you do?

    • Make up silly songs together.
    • Sing while you’re bathing or diapering or feeding your child.
    • Encourage sing alongs for the whole family.
    • If you’re not comfortable singing, remember that the library has lots of CD’s to check out for free.
  • Play with your child

    Children need to use their imagination and creativity; that’s an important part of being a child. It helps them to use their vocabulary when they make up games and stories, and it teaches narrative skills, one of the early literacy skills needed to learn to read.

    What can you do?

    • Make up silly stories! Maybe it’ll be about a zebra with polka dots or a man who walks on his hands.
    • Start reading aloud a book, but ask your child to make up the ending.
    • At dinner, ask your child to tell everyone what they did that day, helping them to keep the events in order.
    • Get down on the floor and pretend to be snakes, or act like monkeys in the backyard.
    • Act out a familiar story with stuffed animals or puppets.
    • Have a prop box with costumes, puppets, and toys for creative play.
  • Write with your child

    Reading and writing are both forms of communication. Encouraging your child to write, even if it’s scribbles, helps them learn print awareness, an understanding of the importance of print and an early literacy skill needed to learn to read.

    What can you do?

    • Make up your own version of a simple story with your child. Have the child draw the pictures and you write the words. Put it together and create a book, written and illustrated by the two of you!
    • Ask your child to write out 3 items to get at the grocery store. Scribbles and nonsense letters are fine; just remember what they’re supposed to mean. Help them locate those print words at the store. “Look, there’s the word ‘apples’ just like you wrote on your list.”
    • Encourage creative writing, with sidewalk chalk, washable markers, or crayons.
    • If a child has a favorite subject, such as horses, help them learn to write words related to it, such as saddle, hoof, or cowgirl.
    • Ask your child to print place cards or menus for special dinners.
Learn More

The following websites will help you learn more about early literacy, as well as find additional activities to do with your child.

Born Learning www.bornlearning.org

On the Ages and Stages page, you can click on the age of your child and it will give you information on topics such as nutrition, sleep, and growth development, as well as how to nurture your child with literacy activities.

Get Ready to Read www.getreadytoread.org

The online or print screening tool will reveal your child’s progress toward mastering three core areas of early literacy—print knowledge, emergent writing, and linguistic awareness. There are also animated online games, activity cards, and checklists to create a “literacy friendly home or classroom.”

International Reading Association www.reading.org

The section on Parent Resources provides printable brochures such as Getting Your Child Ready to Read, and Supporting Your Beginning Reader.

National Center for Family Literacy http://www.famlit.org/free-resources/activities/house/

The Early Literacy House is filled with ideas of activities you can do with your child, in every room of your house.

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development www.nichd.nih.gov

Go to the Publications link, and select “literacy” as the keyword. Several publications will appear that are free to order, or download and print. These were done by the National Institute for Literacy and include, “A Child Becomes A Reader,” “Literacy Begins At Home: Teach Them to Read,” “Shining Stars: Toddlers Get Ready to Read,” and “Shining Stars: Preschoolers Get Ready to Read.”

Parents’ Action For Children www.parentsaction.org

Formerly I Am Your Child, this organization was founded by Rob and Michele Reiner in an effort to inform parents about “the critical importance the prenatal period through the first early years plays in a child’s healthy brain development.”

Reach Out and Read www.reachoutandread.org

This website provides information from pediatricians about the importance of reading aloud, and includes excellent charts of Developmental Milestones in several different languages.

Reading Rockets www.readingrockets.org

A free subscription will bring you access to videos and podcasts, booklists, tips on helping struggling readers, free reading guides, and topics from A to Z that offer help.

Reading Is Fundamental www.rif.org

Go to “Literacy Resources” and click on “Activities”, where you’ll find a printable monthly calendar with simple and inexpensive literacy-based activities between caregiver and child for each day. They also offer a multicultural booklist, and articles for parents about reading aloud.

Washington Learning Systems www.walearning.com

Click on “Literacy Resources,” and you’ll find free, reproducible activities for infants and preschoolers, in Spanish and English. Each activity is followed by tips for success and ways to make it more challenging. You’ll also find “on-the-go” activities for parents to do in the car, or on a walk, and those are translated into Spanish, Mandarin, Vietnamese, Somali, Russian, and Burmese.

Zero To Three www.zerotothree.org

In the section “Behavior and Development” you will find the “Tips and Tools” about early language and literacy, including the Beginnings of Literacy, Learning to Write and Draw, Tips for Choosing Books, Songs, Rhymes and Fingerplays in Spanish and English, and information about how children learn multiple languages.

Print These!

Click on the following, and print out these simple flyers and charts that will help you help your child.


Read, Rhyme and Romp Workshops

Parents & caregivers of young children are invited to schedule "Read, Rhyme and Romp" workshops to learn about the role they have in preparing a child to learn how to read. The workshop provides parents & caregivers with ideas for fun activities with books, creative play, songs and rhymes, as well as an understanding of the stages of child development and the early literacy skills your child can start learning from birth.

To schedule a workshop, contact Heather McNeil, Community Youth Services Manager at 541-617-7099, or heatherm@deschuteslibrary.org.

Workshops can be scheduled at the library, or at another location for an existing group, such as a preschool, church, or parenting class.

Versión en español


Early Literacy Videos

More Videos (Opens YouTube)

  • Storytime

    Storytime Song: A Good Story

    This is a song to sing before each story you read at storytime, to remind the children in a fun way that it's time to listen. This is done as a call and answer. It's time to sit, (audience repeats) It's time to see. (audience repeats) It's time to listen, (audience repeats) To a good story. (audience repeats) So I'll clap my hands, (audience repeats) Then quiet as can be, (audience repeats) I'll listen close, (audience repeats) To a good story. (audience repeats)

  • This

    This is the Way the Ladies Ride

    This Mother Goose rhyme is a great lap bounce. Just remember to always bounce or sway gently enough that it is never hurtful to the child. This is the way the ladies ride, Nimbledy-nim, nimbledy-nim, nimbledy nimbledy nimbledy-nim. This is the way the gentlemen ride. Gallop-a-trot, gallop-a-trot, gallop-a, gallop-a, gallop-a-trot. This is the way the farmers ride, Hobbledy-hoy, hobbledy-hoy, hobbledy, hobbledy, hobbledy-hoy!

  • One

    One Little Cloud

    This rhyme and flannel board is perfect for teaching the beginning concepts of both addition and subtraction. 1 little cloud, sailing in the blue. Along comes another one, now there are 2. 2 clouds coming, now there's more. Help me count, 1, 2, 3, 4. 1 cloud floats away, happily. How many left? 1, 2, 3. Here come 3 to join the mix. How many now? 1-2-3-4-5-6. 5 float away, to visit the sun. Now all we have is little cloud ONE!

  • Storytime

    Storytime Song: My Ears are Ready to Hear

    This song is great to use at the beginning of a storytime, or before each story, so the children know it's time to listen. My ears are ready to hear. My eyes are ready to see. My hands will clap, Then in my lap. It's storytime for me.

  • Aiken

    Aiken Drum

    This song invites participation from your child(ren) by asking them for ideas on what Aiken Drum looks like. It's a great vocabulary builder. There was a man lived on the moon, on the moon, on the moon. There was a man lived on the moon and his name was Aiken Drum. And he played upon the ladle, the ladle, the ladle, He played upon the ladle, and his name was Aiken Drum. (ask child(ren) for ideas of kinds of food, or animal parts, or transportation parts, and add them in to the song as part of Aiken Drum) His nose was made of a peach....and his name was Aiken Drum. His eyes were made of headlights...and his name was Aiken Drum. His ears were made of elephant ears...and his name was Aiken Drum.

  • Storytime

    Storytime is Here

    This song is great to use at the beginning of a storytime, to get the children excited about storytime and ready to listen. Storytime Is Here Tune: There Ain't No Bugs On Me Storytime is here. Give a great big cheer! Songs and rhymes, a real good time. Storytime is here. Storytime is here. Give a great big cheer! Lots of fun, for everyone. Storytime is here. Storytime is here. Give a great big cheer! Bend your knees, give yourself a squeeze. Storytime is here. Storytime is here. Give a great big cheer! Turn around, sit on the ground. Storytime is here. Storytime is here. Give a great big cheer! Quietly, listen and see. Storytime is here.

  • Here's

    Here's My Bag

    This is a rhyming game to use as a "filler" at storytime. You can fill your bag with whatever fits the theme, and pull them out periodically during storytime. Here's my bag with something inside. What could it be? I'll pull it out so you can look. Tell me what you see.

  • I

    I Had a Little Mouse

    This is a rhyming song game. See if you can encourage the children to think of other words that rhyme with "knees." I had a little mouse who never would eat his cheese. All he ever wanted to do was bounce upon my knees. Bounce upon my knees, bounce upon my knees. All he ever wanted to do was bounce upon my knees. I had a little dog who never would scratch his fleas.... I had a little cat who never would climb trees....

  • Three

    Three Little Mice

    This is a counting song, going backwards from however many works for you and your child(ren). It involves tiptoeing mice, and a hungry cat. Three little mice came out to play, Tiptoeing quietly on their way. Out came a pussycat, sleek and black. Pounce! Squeak! 2 little mice went scampering back. Two little mice came out to play.....

  • Rags

    Rags

    This is a popular song about a dog, with simple actions for young children to follow. I have a dog and his name is Rags. He eats so much that his tummy sags. His ears flip flop and his tale wig wags. And when he walks he goes zig zag. He goes flip flop, wig wag, zig zag, He goes flip flop, wig wag, zig zag, He goes flip flop, wig wag, zig zag. I love Rags, and he loves me. Woof!

  • If

    If You're Wearing...

    This is a song to the tune of Mary Had a Little Lamb. Insert different colors, or pieces of clothing to help children practice their vocabulary. It also gets kids moving, which helps them retain attention for longer stories to follow. If you're wearing blue today, blue today, blue today, If you're wearing blue today, please stand up! If you're wearing pants today, pants today, pants today, If you're wearing pants today, please stand up!

  • Rocket

    Rocket Ship Rhyme

    This is a fun and easy in-between rhyme to get kids moving between stories. It also practices counting both forwards and backwards to ten. We're in a rocket ship, (form rocket ship with arms over head) There's not much room. We better take off pretty soon. 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 (blast off/jump up) We're in rocket ship, Orbiting around the moon. We'd better land pretty soon. 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10 (sit back down)

  • Stretching

    Stretching Rhyme

    Follow the actions described by the words. This is a simple stretch that can be inserted anywhere if you notice your audience is getting restless, or to bring a group's attention back to you in a transition. Reach up high, Bend down low. Touch your knees, And sit down slow.

  • My

    My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean

    This is a silly version of a traditional folk song. When you hear a word that starts with the letter "b" or "buh" sound, stand up if you're sitting, or sit down if you're standing. Listening for a specific sound helps kids identify letters, and lays the foundation for spelling and reading. It also gets kids moving, which helps them retain attention for longer stories to follow. I rarely get it right, but that makes it all the more fun! My Bonnie lies over the ocean, My Bonnie lies over the sea, My Bonnie lies over the ocean, O bring back my Bonnie to me. Chorus: Bring back, bring back, O bring back my Bonnie to me, to me: Bring back, bring back, O bring back my Bonnie to me.

  • I'm

    I'm a Little Hunk of Tin

    This is a fun and silly song I remember from my campfire days. Practicing following directions helps kids get ready for the structure of preschool and kindergarten classes, so pairing movements with words will in the order described will help them get ready to learn. I'm a little hunk of tin. No one knows the shape I'm in. Got four wheels and a running board, I'm a four-door, I'm a Ford. Chorus: Honk-honk, rattle, rattle, rattle, Crash, beep, beep. Honk-honk, rattle, rattle, rattle, Crash, beep, beep. Honk-honk, rattle, rattle, rattle, Crash, beep, beep. Honk-honk, honk-honk, honk-honk. Actions: Honk-honk: Pull both ears once for each "honk" Rattle, rattle, rattle: Shake head back and forth for each "rattle" Crash: Gently hit chin with palm of hand Beep, beep: Gently push nose like a button for each "beep"

  • Tickle:

    Tickle: One Little, Two Little

    This song is wonderful to use everywhere! You can be sitting, standing, dancing, and playing. You can use your ten little fingers with tickles and so much more. For example: frogs! 1, 2, 3, little frogs(add other animals). One little, 2 little, 3 little tickles. 4 little, 5 little, 6 little tickles. 7 little, 8 little, 9 little tickles. 10 little tickles everywhere!

  • Pete

    Pete the Pilot (Tune: Old MacDonald)

    This song is great for things that go! For story time, in the car, while traveling, outside/inside at home. You can add a boat, a car, and more! Pete the pilot has a plane Zoom, zoom, zoom, zoom, zoom. And on that plane there are some wings, Zoom, zoom, zoom, zoom, zoom. With a zoom, zoom, here. And a zoom, zoom, there. Everywhere a zoom-zoom, Pete the pilot has a plane, Zoom, zoom, zoom, zoom, zoom. Additional verses: Dan the driver has a truck, Beep, beep, beep, beep, beep

  • A

    A dancing we will go...(tune: Farmer in the Dell)

    You can do all sorts of things with this song sitting down, standing up...even while you're walking to the library. A walking we will go, a walking we will go, dancing we will go, a dancing we will go, Heigh-ho the merry-o, a walking we will go. A waving we will go. A dancing we will go. (add on...A bouncing...A wiggling...A hopping...A skipping)

  • Way

    Way Up High in the Apple Tree

    An action rhyme using your hands as apples along with felt apples. It's fun to use different colored apples. Lyrics: Way up high in the apple tree, two RED apples smiled at me I shook that tree as hard as I could. Down came the apples ...mmmm good.

  • Walking

    Walking to the Library

    A big bag filled with fun stuff to pull out. Kids can guess what you have in the bag. You can also go different places in town, and go there by swimming, running, jumping etc. Lyrics: Walking to the Library what do you see? Do you hear a noise, what could it be?

  • 5

    5 Little Cookies

    Finger and counting rhyme, I like to use felt cookies. If you have a small group you can use the child's name plus add more cookies, or if a big group just use little girl or boy. Lyrics: 5 little cookies in a bakery shop Shining so bright with sugar on top Along came (insert child name or a little girl) with a quarter to pay She bought that cookie and took it away.

  • Fish

    Fish in the Sea

    Description: Song adding color and counting. Use different color felt fish and have the children shout out the color. Lyrics: There are so many fishes(fishies) in the deep blue sea, what color fish do you see? BLUE blue this fish is blue, this little fishy is blue. (repeat until all colored fish out.) Last line: There are so many fishes in the deep blue sea won't you please count them with me.

  • Walking

    Walking Down by the Bay

    Description: Transportation theme, use different felt vehicles have the children shout them out and do actions and sounds of different vehicles. Lyrics: I went walking down by the bay, I saw a CAR along the way I waved at the driver and he waved at me and the car went beep beep beep..

  • I'm

    I'm a Little Fishy (tune: I'm a little teapot)

    This song is fun to use with just about every animal. It's also fun to use food items such as a pumpkin! With "I'm a Little Fishy," you can be standing up or sitting down, using your hands or using a puppet. I'm a little fishy, I can swim. Here is my tail and here is my fins. When I want to have fun with my friends, I wiggle my tail and dive right in.

  • Merry

    Merry Go Round

    To the tune of This Old Man, this fun lap bounce is sure to make your child giggle. Whenever doing a lap bounce, be sure to be gentle with very small babies. Lyrics: Merry-go-round, merry-go-round, bounce baby on lap We go riding all around. bounce baby in a circle on lap First we're UP, then we're DOWN, lift baby on "UP", tip to side on "DOWN" We go riding all around. bounce baby on lap Off to town, off to town, bounce baby on lap We go riding off to town. bounce baby on lap Hold on tight, don't fall down, hug baby on "tight", tip to side on "down" We go riding off to town! bounce baby on lap

  • I'm

    I'm a Little Choo Choo Train

    Description: What child does not love trains? This great little action rhyme describes how a train works. Encourage your child to make lots of noise while doing this rhyme! Lyrics: I'm a little choo choo tain hold arms at your side, bent at the elbow Chugging down the track move arms around in circle at your side, like wheels First I move forward continue train wheel motion Then I move back! circle arms in opposite direction, going backwards Now my bell is ringing act out pulling a bell Hear my whistle blow put hands curved over mouth, other hand at open end What a lot of noise I make, everywhere I go! put hands over ears and shake head

  • Leg

    Leg Over Leg

    This wonderful traditional rhyme is perfect for babies and toddlers. They will ask for it again and again. There is something about being turned almost upside down that children just love! Lyrics: Leg over leg, hold baby on lap, cross less back and forth over each other The dog went to Dover. continue crossing legs over one another When he got to a wall, continue crossing legs over one another UP he went over! on "UP" lift baby's legs so their bottom leaves your lap

  • Pudding

    Pudding on the Plate

    A rhyme with lots of bouncing, wiggling and tipping over. Pudding, candy, cake, oh my! Lyrics: Pudding on the plate, bounce child on lap Pudding on the plate. bounce child on lap Wibble, wobble, wibble, wobble tip child from side to side Pudding on the plate. bounce child on lap Candies in the jar, bounce child on lap Candies in the jar. bounce child on lap Shake them up, shake them up gently shake child's hips to make them wiggle Candies in the jar. bounce child on lap Candles on the cake, bounce child on lap Candles on the cake. bounce child on lap Blow them out, blow them out bounce child on lap Puff, puff, puff. blow gently on child's forehead

  • Put

    Put Your Finger on Your Belly

    One of my all-time favorite storytime songs! A fun way to learn different parts of the body. Lyrics: Put your finger on your belly, on your belly, (suit actions to words) Put your finger on your belly, on your belly. Put your finger on your belly and wiggle it around like jelly, Put your finger on your belly, on your belly! Put your finger in the air, in the air, Put your finger in the air, in the air. Put your finger in the air and wave it around while you're there, Put your finger in the air, in the air! Put your finger on your nose, on your nose, Put your finger on your nose, on your nose. Put your finger on your nose and run it right down to your toes, Put your finger on your nose, on your nose! Put your finger on your toe, on your toe, Put your finger on your toe, on your toe. Put your finger on your toe and move them to and fro, Put your finger on your toe, on your toe! Put your finger on your ear, on your ear, Put your finger on your ear, on your ear. Put your finger on your ear and see if it's still here, Put your finger on your ear, on your ear!

  • Bumpin'

    Bumpin' Up and Down in My Little Red Wagon

    This song combines gentle bouncing, tilting, and snuggling. Lyrics: Bumping up and down in my little red wagon gently bounce baby on lap Bumping up and down in my little red wagon gently bounce baby on lap Bumping up and down in my little red wagon gently bounce baby on knee Won't you be my darling? hug baby One wheel's off and the axle's broken lean baby far to the right One wheel's off and the axle's broken lean baby far to the left One wheel's off and the axle's broken lean baby far to the right Won't you be my darling? hug baby

  • Open

    Open Them, Shut Them

    This is a short rhyme I use with babies and toddlers before we begin a story. It gives them some practice with their fine motor skills and gets them ready to focus on the next story. Lyrics: Open them, shut them open and shut hands Open them, shut them open and shut hands Give a little clap clap hands Open them, shut them open and shut hands Open them, shut them open and shut hands Put them in your lap place hands in lap Creep them, creep them creep hands up body Right up to your chin fingers on chin Open up your little mouth open mouth But do not let them in bring hands behind back Open them, shut them open and shut hands Open them, shut them open and shut hands Give a little clap clap hands Open them, shut them open and shut hands Open them, shut them open and shut hands Put them in your lap place hands in lap

  • Hands

    Hands Up High, Hands Down Low

    A short in-between rhyme, gives young children a chance to stretch and laugh and helps bring their focus back. Hands up high, hands down low Hide those hands! Where did they go? Out comes one. Out comes two. Clap them, fold them, Now we're through

  • Math

    Math Owls

    We do lots of counting rhymes-- this one introduces the child to the ideas of addition and subtraction. Lyrics: 1 little owl, sitting in a tree 2 came to join him, now there are 3 3 little owls, all were saying "whoooo" Ollie flew away, now there are 2 2 little owl, wishing there were more, Ollie returned with a friend, now there are 4 4 little owls, played a game for fun 3 went to hide, then there was 1 One little owl found them all And more besides When they came back—look! There are 1,2,3,4,5

  • I

    I Love the Mountains

    A great song for older children, can be sung with harmonies, in a round, or with two parts. Lyrics: I love the mountains I love the rolling hills I love the springtime (clap) I love the daffodils I love the firelight When the lights are low Boom-di-a-da, boom-di-a-da, Boom-di-a-da, boom-di-a-da

  • La

    La Araña Pequeñita

    "La araña pequeñita" es una canción popular que a la vez es un juego de dedos. ¡Preparen sus dedos! Lírica: La araña pequeñita subió, subió, subió. Vino la lluvia y se la llevo. Salió el sol y todo se seco. ¡Y la araña pequeñita subió, subió, subió! Úsenla también para enseñar lo opuesto de la palabra "pequeñita." La araña grandotota subió, subió, subió. Vino la lluvia y se la llevo. Salió el sol y todo se seco. ¡Y la araña grandotota subió, subió, subió!

  • Mama,

    Mama, Papa y el Tío Juan

    Un rebote de rodillas es muy divertido para su hijo. ¡Solo recuerde de siempre rebotar o mecer al niño suavemente para que nunca sea dañino para él! Lírica: Mama, papa y el Tío Juan Fueron al campo para jugar (rebote al niño en sus rodillas dobladas) Mama se cayó (inclínese a la izquierda) Papa se durmió (inclínese a la derecha) Pero el Tío Juan ¡siguió, siguió, siguió y siguió! (rebote al niño rápidamente)

  • Hola

    Hola Amigos

    Esta canción se usa al principio del tiempo de cuentos. Ayuda a que los niños interactúen juntos y al mismo tiempo superar su timidez. Se puede cantar dos o tres veces hasta que los niños aprendan los movimientos. Lírica : Hola amigos ¿Cómo están? Estoy muy feliz de verlos aquí Saluda a tu vecino (dense la mano) Boogie para abajo Den un salto y ahora una vuelta

  • Adiós

    Adiós Amigos

    ¡Usen este "llamado y respuesta" al final del tiempo de cuentos! Lírica: Adiós amigos (la audiencia lo repite) Ya me voy (la audiencia lo repite) Me dio mucho gusto (la audiencia lo repite) Estar con Ustedes (la audiencia lo repite) ¡Adiós, adiós! (audiencia lo repite)

  • Los

    Los Oídos son para Escuchar

    Esta acción de enfoque se puede usar después de un tiempo de movimiento y ayudara a calmar a los niños y prepararlos para escuchar el cuento. Lírica: Los oídos son para escuchar Los ojos son para ver Ahora se van a sentar Porque es tiempo para leer

Page Last Modified Friday, September 30, 2016


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