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Homegoing

"A Novel Idea... Read Together"

Through “A Novel Idea… Read Together,” thousands of Deschutes County residents share the common bond of reading a selected book and participating in related cultural and literacy events each spring. This program is supported 100% by donations and grants.

Upcoming Events

Full Calendar

  • Apr 25

    6:00 PM - Tuesday - Brooks Room

    Missouri slaves Robin and Polly Holmes and their children were brought from Missouri to Oregon by their owner over the Oregon Trail in 1844, expecting to soon be freed in a region closed to slavery. But their owner, an influential Oregon legislator, ignores the law and keeps them in bondage. Holmes and his wife gain their freedom in 1850, but the slave owner, Nathaniel Ford, refuses to give up their three children. Despite being illiterate and with the odds stacked against him, Holmes took his former master to court in 1852 in an attempt to get his children back in what is the only slavery trial in Oregon history. Hear their story from R. Gregory Nokes, author of Breaking Chains: Slavery on Trial in the Oregon Territory, published by Oregon State University Press. Breaking Chains was a finalist for the 2014 Oregon Book Award for non-fiction and was Number 6 that year in The Oregonian’s ranking of the top ten new books in the Pacific Northwest.

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  • Apr 27

    12:00 PM - Thursday - Meeting Room

    Join artist and educator Jason Graham, a slam poetry champion and speaker who performs hip hop as MOsley WOtta, for a conversation exploring cultural appropriation. During his presentation Jason will share some of his own spoken word poetry as well as other examples of artists who may or may not have crossed the line.Jason Graham is a Chicago-born, Oregon-based artist and educator. He is a former slam poetry champion for the state of Oregon and is currently an art ambassador for Rise Up International in association with the US Department of State. He has been featured multiple times as a TEDx speaker and performer. His CV includes Sundance Film Festival, Fiji International Jazz & Blues Festival, Women’s Muse Conference, MAGIC trade show Las Vegas, Street Con Dubai, Valley Fiesta Australia, and Oregon Art Beat, and he has shared stages with the likes of Ice Cube, Ghostface Killah, Saul Williams, and Talib Kweli, among many others. Most recently he worked as a journalist in Nauru for Vice magazine.

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  • Apr 28

    12:00 PM - Friday - Meeting Room * Registration Required

    Half-sisters Effia and Esi are both given pendants from their mother, Maame in the 2017 Novel Idea selection Homegoing. Chandra vanEijnsbergen, Community Librarian and jewelry maker, leads a pendant making workshop. Each participant will craft their own based on the pendant worn by Effia and her descendants and lost by Esi in the dungeon at Cape Coast Castle.

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  • Apr 29

    3:00 PM - Saturday - Multi-Purpose Room

    Dr. CarmenThompson of Portland State University discusses how the exploitation of African labor through transatlantic and internal slave trading led to the development of an early capitalist Europe; bolstering it and ultimately the United States into world superpowers. Dr. Carmen Thompson is an Oregon Native and a professor of African American history and Black Studies at Portland State University and at Portland Community College. Dr. Thompson holds a Master’s degree in African American Studies from Columbia University in New York and a PhD in U.S. History from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Thompson’s research interests include the history of slavery and the slave trade in the early America and Pre-colonial West Africa, early African American history, race and racism in America, and the Great Migration.

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  • Apr 30

    1:00 PM - Sunday - Brooks Room

    Dr. CarmenThompson of Portland State University discusses how the exploitation of African labor through transatlantic and internal slave trading led to the development of an early capitalist Europe; bolstering it and ultimately the United States into world superpowers. Dr. Carmen Thompson is an Oregon Native and a professor of African American history and Black Studies at Portland State University and at Portland Community College. Dr. Thompson holds a Master’s degree in African American Studies from Columbia University in New York and a PhD in U.S. History from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Thompson’s research interests include the history of slavery and the slave trade in the early America and Pre-colonial West Africa, early African American history, race and racism in America, and the Great Migration.

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  • May 2

    4:00 PM - Tuesday - COCC - Multicultural Center

    Read and discuss Homegoing at COCC.

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  • May 3

    4:00 PM - Wednesday - COCC - Willie Hall

    Based on Dick Lehr's book The Birth of a Movement: How Birth of a Nation Ignited the Battle for Civil Rights, the documentary Birth of a Movement tells the story of William M. Trotter, Boston-based African American newspaper editor and activist. In 1915 Trotter waged a crusade against D.W. Griffith’s technically groundbreaking but notoriously Ku Klux Klan-friendly The Birth of a Nation, igniting a battle still raging today about race relations, media representation, and the power and influence of Hollywood. Birth of a Movement includes interviews with Spike Lee, Reginald Hudlin, DJ Spooky, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and Dick Lehr, and explores how Griffith’s film, frequently held up in film schools as innovative and ground breaking, motivated generations of African American filmmakers and artists to reclaim their history and their onscreen image.Sponsored by COCC Multicultural Activities

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  • May 6

    2:00 PM - Saturday - Meeting Room

    Traces of the Trade: A Story from the Deep North follows filmmaker Katrina Browne and nine fellow DeWolf family descendants, ranging from siblings to seventh cousins, as they retrace the steps of the Triangle Slave Trade, visiting the historic DeWolf hometown of Bristol, Rhode Island, slave forts on the coast of Ghana (highlighted in Yaa Gyasi’s Homegoing), and the ruins of a family plantation in Cuba. Back home, the family members grapple with questions we all face in the United States today: What is the legacy of slavery and racism? What do we inherit as individuals and as a nation? What would healing look like? The Emmy-nominated documentary was an Official Selection of the Sundance Film Festival and premiered on national television on the acclaimed PBS series P.O.V.Long-time Central Oregon resident, Tom DeWolf, is featured in the film and will facilitate the post-screening discussion. Tom wrote about his experience making the film in his book Inheriting the Trade (Beacon Press). This screening was envisioned by long-time Sisters resident Bonnie Malone, and is supported by Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church in Sisters in partnership with the Deschutes Library District and A Novel Idea.“Traces of the Trade is a stark reminder of how far this nation has come – and the distance it must yet go. . .” – DeWayne Wickham, Gannett News Service“A moving film.” – Bill Moyers, Bill Moyers Journal, PBS

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  • May 7

    4:00 PM - Sunday - Bend High School

    Deschutes Public Library Foundation welcomes Homegoing author Yaa Gyasi. The final event of the A Novel Idea 2017 is free and open to the public but tickets are required. Tickets will be available on-line at www.dplfoundation.org at 9:00 a.m. and at all branch libraries during regular business hours starting on April 15. Two tickets per person limit.

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  • May 9

    4:00 PM - Tuesday - COCC - Boyle Education Center

    13th, nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature in 2017, explores reasons behind the mass incarceration of African Americans and Latinos. The director, Ava Du Vernay, demonstrates that the legacy of slavery stills exists in practices embedded in the current criminal justice system. She specifically examines the prison industrial complex illustrating how corporations are benefitting from incarceration. The film gets its name from the Thirteenth Amendment in the United States Constitution which ended slavery and freed all slaves in the US.Sponsored by COCC Multicultural Activities

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Page Last Modified Thursday, March 16, 2017


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